San Diego Music Photography Workshop

We are doing it. You are invited. A long time in the making for a ranged of reasons, maybe we will get into that, maybe not. But long story short if you want to be a music photogrpaher and are having some trouble – I got you. I have tried over the years to grow as the people who follow me grow. It can be very difficult to have a gauge on. I try my best to listen to you, so I am hoping this helps some of you and it is where you are at.

Its nerve wracking to launch these things. I had a hard week just coming terms with the fact that… it could fail. Stuff can always fail. It is so difficult to push forward when you have that voice constantly speaking with you somewhere in your head. But here we are. So my dream has been for a long time to be able to teach you about music photography where it matters most. In a venue. It’s going to be awesome. There are two classes. Intermediate and advanced. If you are experienced with music photography go advanced, if you aren’t but know your camera- intermediate. If you don’t know your camera yet, you can do the workshop however some of it will be more challenging for you than others. Scope the full details below. If you have any questions at all, just email me. support@amusicphotographymagazine.com

Concert Photography Level Up – buy a ticket

This class is for photographers who already have experience with photography. You are expected to know your way around your camera. The goal of this class is to help you on your path to becoming a professional Music Photographer. This will be a full day of instruction and hands on shooting. You will need to provide your own camera and a laptop is not required but suggested.


The workshop will take place in two different places. Specific locations depend on the city.

  • The Classroom– aka a room with chairs, couches and a projector
  • The Venue – a real concert venue, only we will have it all to ourselves

Daily Outline

The Business Of Music Photography – Adam will teach you everything he knows from over 10+ years of experience in the industry.

  • What is Music Photography?
  • Direction with Intention
  • Identifying and Creating Your Brand
  • Improving Your Style
  • Getting Hired
  • Creating Luck
  • Getting Paid
  • Maintaining and Growing your Relationships
  • Don’t Sweat The Small Stuff

Getting To Know The Venue– Shooting at a venue can be a stressful and overwhelming experience. Our goal is to alleviate that for you as much as possible. You will be taken on a guided tour through the venue. No areas are off limits. Everything will be explained to you.

  • Full Venue Tour
  • Picking Up Your Photo-pass
  • Dealing With Day Of Problems
  • Stage Tour
  • Shooting From The Pit
  • Pit Etiquette
  • Photographing in other areas of the venue
  • Lens Choices

Live Band Shoot – Just the photographers and the band. No security, no fans, no bottles being thrown at your face. A variety of shooting locations and lighting situations will be practiced and reviewed together.

  • Pit
  • Front Of House
  • Audience
  • Sidestage

Q & A With The Band – Sit down with two touring musicians who have been doing this for more than 10 years each. It time to ask all those questions you never get the chance to ask.

  • What Makes A Band Like Your Image?
  • Do & Do Nots of Photographing an Artist
  • How To Contact An Artist

Post Processing & Workflow

  • What Makes A Good Live Photo?
  • Image Selection
  • Delivering Your Images To Your Client

Becoming A Touring Music Photographer – buy a ticket

This class is for photographers who already have a consistent career in Music Photography and are looking to take the next step and become a tour photogrpaher. This will be a full day of instruction and hands on shooting. You will need to provide your own camera and a laptop is not required but suggested.


The workshop will take place in two different places. Specific locations depend on the city.

  • The Classroom– aka a room with chairs, couches and a projector
  • The Venue – a real concert venue, only we will have it all to ourselves

Daily Outline

Music Photography Level Up – Touring is a whole different ball game. There is a lot to learn after you learn photography, this is that*

  • Direction with Intention
  • Establishing, Maintaining, and Growing your Relationships
  • Knowing Your Artist
  • Working with your Artist on and off Stage
  • Roles/ Jobs of Touring Crew defined
  • Agreements / Licensing images
  • Living Life On The Road

A Venue As Your Office and Home– By this point you probably don’t even notice the 100’s and thousands of people at concerts. But there is so much more to a venue, learn how to make it your home and office.

  • Full Venue Tour – Backstage and Onstage
  • Day to Day Routine of Being on the Road
  • Scouting A Venue
  • Where/ When/ How to shoot Backstage
  • Portraits
  • All Access and What It Means
  • Where You Can and Can’t Shoot

Live Band Shoot – Just the photographers and the band. No security, no fans, no bottles being thrown at your face. This will be a bit more personal than the intermediate class and focus more on shooting from stage/ on stage.

  • Photographing Soundcheck
  • Boundaries
  • Dos and Don’t
  • Making Mistakes
  • Advantages of Shooting the Same Show 10’s of Times
  • Shooting on Stage and Backstage

Q & A With Crew – Sit down with at least five touring crew/ musicians who have been doing this for more than 10 years. It time to ask all those questions you never get the chance to ask. Learn the mistakes you don’t want to have to make.

Possible Crew:

  • Front Of House
  • Light Designer
  • Drum Tech
  • Drummer
  • Guitarist
  • Guitar Tech
  • Tour Manager
  • Production Manager

Post Processing & Workflow

  • What Makes A Good Live Photo?
  • Image Selection
  • Delivering Your Images To Your Client

Backstage Portrait Shoot

The Important(boring) Computer Stuff

  • Backing Up Your Work Safely
  • Meeting Client Expectations
  • Selecting and Editing Images
  • Turning In Your Images
POSTED BY Adam Elmakias

Adam Elmakias is a music photographer based out of San Diego, California. He spends most of his time doing stuff with cameras. Adam wrote this himself, not someone else. I am Adam.

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